Knowledge Iceberg model

According to Victor D. Manriquez,  knowledge is a crucial resource because it is inexhaustible and can be used by many organizations.

We live in the knowledge age, and individuals and organizations who can adapt to the inevitable changes are the ones who will be able to face the future challenges. Those who don’t will be part of the past.

Three criteria must be met before information can be considered knowledge:

  • Knowledge is connected. It exists in a collection of multiple experiences and perspectives.
  • Knowledge is an action. Information that does not precipitate some type of action is not knowledge.
  • Knowledge is applicable in new and unique situations. Information becomes knowledge when it is used to address circumstances for which no direct precedent exists.

According to Delphi Group, about 42% of the knowledge that professionals need to do their jobs comes from other people’s brains in the form of advice, opinions, judgments or answers. This means when a person leaves the company, they take the knowledge with them…

Data and information need to be integrated to arrive at knowledge, and what is data to some may be information for others. Knowledge is, however, information that has been edited and analyzed in such a manner to make it useful

Punditas, a Social Product Intelligence company has a unique and innovative approach to access Enterprise Application Knowledge from 10’s of sources to help you make data based decisions. Punditas Advisor presents curated knowledge for CAD, PLM and other Enterprise Application Softwares.  The Visual, Interactive platform from Punditas allows companies to access,capture and review knowledge from In-house and External experts within the context of an App’s feature, function or bug. The picture below shows one example of accessing knowledge from experts in the field.

For more information about Punditas Advisor, please visit http://www.punditas.com

Sources & Credits

The Importance of Integrating Knowledge Management with Maintenance

Sharing Organizational Knowledge through Knowledge repositories

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s